Semnan University of Medical Sciences

Research and Technology Vice Chancellor

Rashidi, Mohammad and Rashidy-Pour, Ali and Ghorbani, Raheb (2010) Effect of passive and active recovery from supramaximal exercise on blood lactate levels in male athletes. Koomesh. pp. 209-215.

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    Abstract

    Introduction: One important factor of fatigue occurrence among athletes, following heavy sport activities, especially sports activities with short time and the maximum speed and intensity, is the accumulation of lactic acid in blood. The need for athletes to achieve natural conditions and to prepare for the next activities, methods of disposal lactic acid are very important. The purpose of this study was to study the effects of passive and active recovery with a severity of 55, 60 and 65 percent of maximum heart rate, on levels of blood lactic acid. Material and Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried by 60 male athletes' students who were divided randomly to four groups. The first group included 15 subjects of group programs for passive recovery and the second, third and fourth groups off the state quarter program for active recovery with highly active 55, 60 and 65 percent of maximum heart rate, respectively. Groups acting Cunningham test began to test blood lactic acid in four stages (before the activity, immediately after the activity, 5 and 20 minute period recovery). The measurement was done by a hand lacto – meter. Results: The mean amount of blood lactic acid during resting time in four groups and also immediately after the activity was not significant, but 5 minutes after recovery as well as 20 minutes after recovery difference between groups was significant (P<0.001). Mean blood lactic acid 20 minutes after recovery of passive group was significantly higher and that of group with 60 percent maximum heart rate was significantly lower (P<0.001) than other groups. Also the rate of the decrease in lactic acid level within 5 to 20 minutes after recovery in group with 60% maximum heart rate was significantly more than group 55%. The rate of decrease with group 65% maximum heart rate was shown to be significantly more than group 55% with maximum heart rate (p <0.001). Conclusion: Our findings showed that active recovery from supramaximal exercise had a better effect than passive mode in reducing blood lactate levels in male athletes. Moreover, active recovery with a rate of 60 percent of maximum heart rate had a better effect than those of 55 or 65% maximum heart rat. Keywords: Lactic acid, Rrecovery, Passive recovery, Active recovery, Athletes

    Item Type: Article
    Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
    Divisions: Faculty of Medical Sciences > School of Medicine
    Depositing User: Mr Vahab Moshtaghi
    Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2016 03:22
    Last Modified: 21 Dec 2016 03:22
    URI: http://eprints.semums.ac.ir/id/eprint/660

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